ECODESIGN FOR CITIES AND SUBURBS, a new free internet course offered on edX by the University of British Columbia

Architects, urban planners, real-estate developers, landscape architects, and anyone else who is interested in the future of cities – especially students in all these disciplines, should check out this free, open course, taught by Larry Beasley, the former planning director of Vancouver, who is a Distinguished Professor of Practice at UBC, and Jonathan Barnett, a noted authority on urban design from the University of Pennsylvania.

The whole mechanism of city planning and urban development, worldwide, is producing a form of urbanization which is not compatible with our environment. Almost everything that is being built is making the problem worse, and climate change and rapid population growth are turning a badly flawed system into something that could literally end in disaster.

Using real examples from around the world, Beasley and Barnett show how integrating planning, urban design and the conservation of natural systems can produce a sustainable built and natural environment, implemented through normal business practices and the kinds of capital programs and regulations already in use in most communities.

The first session of the course will start April 4th. Here is a link to the full course description and the intro video.

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Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs: A new book by Larry Beasley and Jonathan Barnett

Book.BAPWebsiteCoverImage.Ecodesign for Cities and Suburbs

Purchase Here: http://islandpress.org/ecodesign-for-cities-and-suburbs

As world population grows, and more people move to cities and suburbs, they place greater stress on the operating system of our whole planet. But urbanization and increasing densities also present our best opportunity for improving sustainability, by transforming urban development into desirable, lower-carbon, compact and walkable communities and business centers.

Jonathan Barnett and Larry Beasley seek to demonstrate that a sustainable built and natural environment can be achieved through ecodesign, which integrates the practice of planning and urban design with environmental conservation, through normal business practices and the kinds of capital programs and regulations already in use in many communities. Ecodesign helps adapt the design of our built environment to both a changing climate and a rapidly growing world, creating more desirable places in the process.

In six comprehensively illustrated chapters, the authors explain ecodesign concepts, including the importance of preserving and restoring natural systems while also adapting to climate change; minimizing congestion on highways and at airports by making development more compact, and by making it easier to walk, cycle and take trains and mass transit; crafting and managing regulations to insure better placemaking and  fulfill consumer preferences, while incentivizing preferred practices; creating an inviting and environmentally responsible public realm from parks to streets to forgotten spaces; and finally how to implement these ecodesign concepts.          

Throughout the book, the ecodesign framework is demonstrated by innovative practices that are already underway or have been accomplished in many cities and suburbs—from Hammarby Sjöstad in Stockholm to False Creek North in Vancouver to Battery Park City in Manhattan, as well as many smaller-scale examples that can be adopted in any community. 

Ecodesign thinking is relevant to anyone who has a part in shaping or influencing the future of cities and suburbs – designers, public officials, and politicians.